Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 9, 2011
Previous Article Next Article

Photochemical control of bacterial signal processing using a light-activated erythromycin

Author affiliations

Abstract

Bacterial cells control resistance to the macrolide antibiotic erythromycin using the MphR(A) repressor protein. Erythromycin binds to MphR(A), causing release of the PmphR promoter, activating expression of the 2′-phosphotransferase Mph(A). We engineered the MphR(A)/promoter system to, in conjunction with a light-activatable derivative of erythromycin, enable photochemical activation of gene expression in E. coli. We applied this photochemical gene switch to the construction of a light-triggered logic gate, a light-controlled band-pass filter, as well as spatial and temporal control of gene expression.

Graphical abstract: Photochemical control of bacterial signal processing using a light-activated erythromycin

Back to tab navigation

Supplementary files

Publication details

The article was received on 04 May 2011, accepted on 11 Jul 2011 and first published on 22 Jul 2011


Article type: Communication
DOI: 10.1039/C1MB05166K
Citation: Mol. BioSyst., 2011,7, 2554-2557
  •   Request permissions

    Photochemical control of bacterial signal processing using a light-activated erythromycin

    L. Gardner, Y. Zou, A. Mara, T. A. Cropp and A. Deiters, Mol. BioSyst., 2011, 7, 2554
    DOI: 10.1039/C1MB05166K

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements