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Issue 3, 2011
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Ambient concentrations of airborne endotoxin in two cities in the interior of British Columbia, Canada

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Abstract

This study measured and analyzed the outdoor airborne endotoxin concentration, on particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10), for two cities in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. Samples were collected throughout one seasonal cycle, from October 2005 to September 2006. It was found that concentrations were generally highest in the summer and fall, and lowest in the winter and spring. Temperature and relative humidity were found to be most influential, with highest endotoxin concentrations recorded during warm periods and moderate relative humidity (35 to 75 percent). No clear association of concentration with wind direction was observed. Results were comparable between the two cities considered in this study, and concentrations were similar to or slightly higher than those reported by other studies considering urban locations. Endotoxin concentration was also found to be positively associated with agricultural dust sources identified by a source apportionment study conducted at one of the sampling locations.

Graphical abstract: Ambient concentrations of airborne endotoxin in two cities in the interior of British Columbia, Canada

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Publication details

The article was received on 27 May 2010, accepted on 15 Dec 2010 and first published on 24 Jan 2011


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C0EM00235F
Citation: J. Environ. Monit., 2011,13, 631-640
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    Ambient concentrations of airborne endotoxin in two cities in the interior of British Columbia, Canada

    J. Allen, K. Bartlett, M. Graham and P. Jackson, J. Environ. Monit., 2011, 13, 631
    DOI: 10.1039/C0EM00235F

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