Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 8, 2011
Previous Article Next Article

Effect of pore size on carbon dioxide sorption by carbide derived carbon

Author affiliations

Abstract

CO2 sorption at atmospheric and sub-atmospheric pressures is a key step towards carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and materials capable of fast and efficient CO2 uptake are currently being studied extensively. Carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) show a very high sorption capacity for CO2 of up to 7.1 mol/kg at 0 °C and ambient pressure. This value is significantly higher than other carbon materials. Systematic experimental investigation of a large number of different CDCs derived from nano- and micrometer sized precursors with and without activation show a linear correlation between the CO2 uptake at a certain pressure and the pore volume. However, CO2 sorption is not limited by the total pore volume but only by pores smaller than a certain diameter. At 1 bar, pores smaller than 0.8 nm contribute the most to the CO2 uptake and at 0.1 bar pores smaller or equal to 0.5 nm are preferred. With lower total pressure, smaller pores contribute more to the measured amount of adsorbed CO2. The prediction of the CO2 uptake based on the pore volume for pores of a certain diameter is much more accurate than predictions based on the mean pore size or the specific surface area. This study provides guidelines for the design of materials with an improved ability to remove carbon dioxide from the environment at atmospheric and lower pressures.

Graphical abstract: Effect of pore size on carbon dioxide sorption by carbide derived carbon

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 16 Feb 2011, accepted on 09 Jun 2011 and first published on 30 Jun 2011


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C1EE01176F
Citation: Energy Environ. Sci., 2011,4, 3059-3066
  •   Request permissions

    Effect of pore size on carbon dioxide sorption by carbide derived carbon

    V. Presser, J. McDonough, S. Yeon and Y. Gogotsi, Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 3059
    DOI: 10.1039/C1EE01176F

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements