Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 8, 2011
Previous Article Next Article

Chemical ‘Jekyll and Hyde’s: small-molecule inhibitors of developmental signaling pathways

Author affiliations

Abstract

Small molecules that perturb developmental signaling pathways can have devastating effects on embryonic patterning, as evidenced by the chemically induced onset of cyclopic lambs and children with severely shortened limbs during the 1950s. Recent studies, however, have revealed critical roles for these pathways in human disorders and diseases, spurring the re-examination of these compounds as new targeted therapies. In this tutorial review, we describe four case studies of teratogenic compounds, including inhibitors of the Hedgehog (Hh), Wnt, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathways. We discuss how these teratogens were discovered, their mechanisms of action, their utility as molecular probes, and their potential as therapeutic agents. We also consider current challenges in the field and possible directions for future research.

Graphical abstract: Chemical ‘Jekyll and Hyde’s: small-molecule inhibitors of developmental signaling pathways

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 15 Jan 2011 and first published on 19 Apr 2011


Article type: Tutorial Review
DOI: 10.1039/C1CS15019G
Citation: Chem. Soc. Rev., 2011,40, 4318-4331
  •   Request permissions

    Chemical ‘Jekyll and Hyde’s: small-molecule inhibitors of developmental signaling pathways

    T. Sakata and J. K. Chen, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2011, 40, 4318
    DOI: 10.1039/C1CS15019G

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements