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Issue 3, 2011
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Recent advancements in optical DNA biosensors: Exploiting the plasmonic effects of metal nanoparticles

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Abstract

The emerging field of plasmonics, the study of electromagnetic responses of metal nanostructures, has revealed many novel signal enhancing phenomena. As applied to the development of label-free optical DNA biosensors, it is now well established that plasmon-based surface enhanced spectroscopies on nanostructured metal surfaces or metal nanoparticles can markedly improve the sensitivity of optical biosensors, with some showing great promise for single molecule detection. In this review, we first summarize the basic concepts of plasmonics in metal nanostructures, as well as the characteristic optical phenomena to which plasmons give rise. We will then describe recent advances in optical DNA biosensing systems enabled by metal nanoparticle-derived plasmonic effects, including the use of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), colorimetric methods, “scanometric” processes, and metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF).

Graphical abstract: Recent advancements in optical DNA biosensors: Exploiting the plasmonic effects of metal nanoparticles

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Publication details

The article was received on 13 Aug 2010, accepted on 14 Oct 2010 and first published on 03 Nov 2010


Article type: Critical Review
DOI: 10.1039/C0AN00636J
Citation: Analyst, 2011,136, 436-447
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    Recent advancements in optical DNA biosensors: Exploiting the plasmonic effects of metal nanoparticles

    H. Peng and B. L. Miller, Analyst, 2011, 136, 436
    DOI: 10.1039/C0AN00636J

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