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Issue 20, 2010
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A microfluidic approach for in vitro assessment of interorgan interactions in drug metabolism using intestinal and liver slices

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Abstract

Over the past two decades, it has become increasingly clear that the intestine, in addition to the liver, plays an important role in the metabolism of xenobiotics. Previously, we developed a microfluidic-based in vitro system for the perifusion of precision-cut liver slices for metabolism studies. In the present study, the applicability of this system for the perifusion of precision-cut intestinal slices, and for the sequential perifusion of intestinal and liver slices, all from rat, was tested to mimic the in vivo first pass situation. Intestinal and liver slices, exposed to the substrates 7-ethoxycoumarin (7-EC), 7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC) and lidocaine (Li), exhibited similar metabolic rates in the biochip and in the well plates for periods of at least 3 h. The metabolic rate remained the same when two slices were placed in adjacent microchambers and perifused sequentially. In addition, the system has been adapted to sequentially perifuse intestinal and liver tissue slices in a two-compartment co-culture perfusion system with a continuous flow of medium. It becomes possible to direct metabolites or other excreted compounds formed by an intestinal slice in the first compartment to the second compartment containing a liver slice. The intestine does not influence liver metabolism for these substrates. The interplay between these two organs was demonstrated by exposing the slices to the primary bile acid, chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA). CDCA induced the expression of fibroblast growth factor 15 (FGF15) in the intestinal slice, which resulted in a stronger down-regulation of the enzyme, cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), in the liver slice in the second compartment than when the liver slice was exposed to CDCA in a single-microchamber biochip. We thus demonstrate in this paper that intestinal slices, in addition to liver slices, remain functional in the biochip under flow conditions, and that the two-microchamber biochip has great potential for the study of interorgan effects. This is the first example of the incorporation of both liver and intestinal slices in a microfluidic device. Use of this microfluidic system will improve our insight into interorgan interactions and elucidate as yet unknown mechanisms involved in toxicity, gene regulation and drugdrug interactions.

Graphical abstract: A microfluidic approach for in vitro assessment of interorgan interactions in drug metabolism using intestinal and liver slices

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Publication details

The article was received on 21 May 2010, accepted on 06 Aug 2010 and first published on 07 Sep 2010


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/C0LC00043D
Citation: Lab Chip, 2010,10, 2778-2786
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    A microfluidic approach for in vitro assessment of interorgan interactions in drug metabolism using intestinal and liver slices

    P. M. van Midwoud, M. T. Merema, E. Verpoorte and G. M. M. Groothuis, Lab Chip, 2010, 10, 2778
    DOI: 10.1039/C0LC00043D

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