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Issue 12, 2010
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Polyaniline-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes: synthesis, characterization and impact on primary immune cells

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Abstract

Functionalized carbon nanotubes are increasingly exploited as innovative components for the development of advanced biomedical devices. In this study we report a novel synthetic route for the formation of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)–polyaniline (PANI) hybrids by in situ chemical polymerization. The surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) is used as a template for monomer assembly and polymerization. The resulting composite preserves the surfactant and is characterized by a tight binding between SWCNTs and PANI. Having the idea of integrating these new types of SWCNT conjugates into advanced biomedical tools (i.e. implantable multi-electrode arrays), we explored their potential impact on the viability and function of cells from the immune system. We have compared the cytotoxic effects of SWCNT-COOH, SWCNT/SDS and SWCNT/SDS/PANI on mouse spleen cells and macrophages. The results indicate that biocompatibility of the different SWCNT conjugates is dependent both on the doses used and the type of cells.

Graphical abstract: Polyaniline-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes: synthesis, characterization and impact on primary immune cells

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The article was received on 20 Oct 2009, accepted on 14 Jan 2010 and first published on 11 Feb 2010


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/B921828A
Citation: J. Mater. Chem., 2010,20, 2408-2417
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    Polyaniline-coated single-walled carbon nanotubes: synthesis, characterization and impact on primary immune cells

    S. Ben-Valid, H. Dumortier, M. Décossas, R. Sfez, M. Meneghetti, A. Bianco and S. Yitzchaik, J. Mater. Chem., 2010, 20, 2408
    DOI: 10.1039/B921828A

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