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Issue 2, 2010
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Probing bioinorganic chemistry processes in the bloodstream to gain new insights into the origin of human diseases

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Abstract

In the context of elucidating the origin of human diseases, past poisoning epidemics have revealed that exceedingly small doses of inorganic environmental pollutants can result in dramatic effects on human health. Today, numerous organic and inorganic pollutants have been quantified in human blood, but the interpretation of these concentrations remains—from a public health point of view—problematic. Conversely, the biomolecular origin for several grievous human diseases is essentially unknown. Taken together and viewed in the context of recent bioinorganic research findings, the established human blood concentrations of toxic metals and metalloids may be functionally connected with the etiology of specific human diseases. To unravel the underlying biomolecular mechanisms, and taking into account the basic flow of dietary matter through mammalian organisms, a better understanding of the bioinorganic chemistry of toxic metals and metalloid compounds in the bloodstream is emerging as a promising avenue for future research. To this end, the concerted application of modern proteomic methodologies, synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy and established spectroscopic techniques will contribute to better define the role that blood-based bioinorganic chemistry-related processes play in the origin of human diseases. The application of this and other modern proteomic methodologies could contribute to a better understanding of the role that blood-based bioinorganic chemistry-related processes play in the origin and etiology of human diseases.

Graphical abstract: Probing bioinorganic chemistry processes in the bloodstream to gain new insights into the origin of human diseases

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Publication details

The article was received on 30 Jun 2009, accepted on 15 Oct 2009 and first published on 06 Nov 2009


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/B912941N
Citation: Dalton Trans., 2010,39, 329-336
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    Probing bioinorganic chemistry processes in the bloodstream to gain new insights into the origin of human diseases

    E. Zeini Jahromi and J. Gailer, Dalton Trans., 2010, 39, 329
    DOI: 10.1039/B912941N

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