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Issue 4, 2010
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In situ click chemistry: probing the binding landscapes of biological molecules

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Abstract

Combinatorial approaches to the discovery of new functional molecules are well established among chemists and biologists, inspired in large measure by the modular composition of many systems and molecules in Nature. Many approaches rely on the synthesis and testing of individual members of a candidate combinatorial library, but attention has also been paid to techniques that allow the target to self-assemble its own binding agents. These fragment-based methods, grouped under the general heading of target-guided synthesis (TGS), show great promise in lead discovery applications. In this tutorial review, we review the use of the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of organic azides and alkynes in a kinetically-controlled TGS approach, termed in situ click chemistry. The azidealkyne reaction has several distinct advantages, most notably high chemoselectivity, very low background ligation rates, facile synthetic accessibility, and the stability and properties of the 1,2,3-triazole products. Examples of the discovery of potent inhibitors of acetylcholinesterases, carbonic anhydrase, HIV-protease, and chitinase are described, as are methods for the templated assembly of agents that bind DNA and proteins.

Graphical abstract: In situ click chemistry: probing the binding landscapes of biological molecules

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Publication details

The article was received on 25 Jan 2010 and first published on 01 Mar 2010


Article type: Tutorial Review
DOI: 10.1039/B901969N
Citation: Chem. Soc. Rev., 2010,39, 1252-1261
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    In situ click chemistry: probing the binding landscapes of biological molecules

    S. K. Mamidyala and M. G. Finn, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2010, 39, 1252
    DOI: 10.1039/B901969N

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