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Issue 10, 2009
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Modulation of attractive colloidal interactions by lipid membrane-functionalization

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Abstract

Achieving simple, effective control of interactions between microparticles is an important goal of colloidal science, due both to its widespread technological relevance and its potential to illuminate the fundamental mechanisms governing structure and dynamics in complex fluids. Such control has remained elusive, however, especially with respect to attractive forces between microparticles. The studies described here adopt a biomimetic approach, functionalizing inorganic microparticles with biomolecular membranes. We provide the first reported measurements of the pair interaction energy, the key determinant of colloidal behavior, for such particles. The data demonstrate strong, tunable attractive interactions. Moreover, control of lipid composition enables a striking insight into the long-standing paradox of “like-charge attraction” observed in confined colloidal systems: G. M. Kepler and S. Fraden, Phys. Rev. Lett., 1994, 73, 356–359; D. G. Grier, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter, 2000, 12, A85–A94; M. Polin, D. G. Grier and Y. Han, Phys. Rev. E, 2007, 76, 041406–041407. Decomposing the measured interactions into charge-dependent and -independent terms, we find that the charge-dependent term in the interaction is purely repulsive, while the attraction is independent of particle charge.

Graphical abstract: Modulation of attractive colloidal interactions by lipid membrane-functionalization

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Publication details

The article was received on 01 Dec 2008, accepted on 24 Feb 2009 and first published on 31 Mar 2009


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/B821441G
Citation: Soft Matter, 2009,5, 2027-2032
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    Modulation of attractive colloidal interactions by lipid membrane-functionalization

    Y. Kong and R. Parthasarathy, Soft Matter, 2009, 5, 2027
    DOI: 10.1039/B821441G

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