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Issue 8, 2009
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Resonant Mie scattering in infrared spectroscopy of biological materials – understanding the ‘dispersion artefact’

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Abstract

Infrared spectroscopic cytology is potentially a powerful clinical tool. However, in order for it to be successful, practitioners must be able to extract reliably a pure absorption spectrum from a measured spectrum that often contains many confounding factors. The most intractable problem to date is the, so called, dispersion artefact which most prominently manifests itself as a sharp decrease in absorbance on the high wavenumber side of the amide I band in the measured spectrum, exhibiting a derivative-like line shape. In this paper we use synchrotron radiation FTIR micro-spectroscopy to record spectra of mono-dispersed poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres of systematically varying size and demonstrate that the spectral distortions in the data can be understood in terms of resonant Mie scattering. A full understanding of this effect will enable us to develop strategies for deconvolving the scattering contribution and recovering the pure absorption spectrum, thus removing one of the last technological barriers to the development of clinical spectroscopic cytology.

Graphical abstract: Resonant Mie scattering in infrared spectroscopy of biological materials – understanding the ‘dispersion artefact’

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Publication details

The article was received on 10 Mar 2009, accepted on 22 May 2009 and first published on 11 Jun 2009


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/B904808A
Citation: Analyst, 2009,134, 1586-1593
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    Resonant Mie scattering in infrared spectroscopy of biological materials – understanding the ‘dispersion artefact’

    P. Bassan, H. J. Byrne, F. Bonnier, J. Lee, P. Dumas and P. Gardner, Analyst, 2009, 134, 1586
    DOI: 10.1039/B904808A

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