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Issue 3, 2007
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Hyaluronan in the pericellular coat: an additional layer of complexity in early cell adhesion events

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Abstract

Cell adhesion is a multistage process whereby specific surface receptors interact with the corresponding ligands on the extracellular matrix or on neighboring cells. These complex interactions involve a wide variety of cellular molecules including transmembrane and cytoskeletal components, scaffolding proteins, and a wide variety of signaling enzymes. In this article we discuss recent data characterizing the involvement of the pericellular hyaluronan coat in early stages of cell–matrix adhesion. In particular, we address the mechanisms underlying the transition from hyaluronan- to integrin-mediated adhesion, and the role of the actin cytoskeleton in the “inside-out” regulation and maintenance of the pericellular hyaluronan coat.

Graphical abstract: Hyaluronan in the pericellular coat: an additional layer of complexity in early cell adhesion events

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Publication details

The article was received on 22 Sep 2006, accepted on 14 Dec 2006 and first published on 18 Jan 2007


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/B613770A
Citation: Soft Matter, 2007,3, 327-332
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    Hyaluronan in the pericellular coat: an additional layer of complexity in early cell adhesion events

    M. Cohen, D. Joester, I. Sabanay, L. Addadi and B. Geiger, Soft Matter, 2007, 3, 327
    DOI: 10.1039/B613770A

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