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Issue 10, 2007
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Cargo pick-up from engineered loading stations by kinesin driven molecular shuttles

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Abstract

Exploiting biological motors ex vivo to transport and distribute cargo with high spatial control, as done by cells, requires that we learn how molecular shuttles (microtubules propelled by kinesin) can pick up cargo from defined surface regions (loading stations). The main challenge of building microfabricated cargo loading stations is to adjust the sum of non-covalent interactions such that the station stably holds on to the cargo under static conditions, but allows for transfer when a gliding microtubule collides with station-bound cargo and starts to pull on it. Successful pick-up of cargo could be observed using biotin–anti-biotin interactions and hybridized oligonucleotides. The effect of different tethering chemistries on the efficiency of cargo pick-up was tested.

Graphical abstract: Cargo pick-up from engineered loading stations by kinesin driven molecular shuttles

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Publication details

The article was received on 15 May 2007, accepted on 03 Jul 2007 and first published on 25 Jul 2007


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/B707301A
Citation: Lab Chip, 2007,7, 1263-1271
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    Cargo pick-up from engineered loading stations by kinesin driven molecular shuttles

    C. Brunner, C. Wahnes and V. Vogel, Lab Chip, 2007, 7, 1263
    DOI: 10.1039/B707301A

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