Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 5, 2007
Previous Article Next Article

A 96-well microplate incorporating a replica molded microfluidic network integrated with photonic crystal biosensors for high throughput kinetic biomolecular interaction analysis

Author affiliations

Abstract

A nanoreplica molding process has been used to produce polymer microfluidic channels, with integrated label-free photonic crystal biosensors as the bottom surface of the channels. Multiple flow channels are gathered in parallel so that an imaging detection instrument may simultaneously monitor the binding kinetics of many biomolecular interactions. In this work, the flow channel pattern has been adapted to a 96-well microplate format in which, for each 12-element row of the microplate, a single well serves as a common access port for 11 flow channels that are connected to separate microplate wells. Application of pneumatic pressure or suction to the common well serves to drive forward or backward flow to the channels. The system is demonstrated by measuring the kinetic binding interaction of protein A with IgG molecules of high, medium, and low affinity. The approach offers a means for minimizing the volume of reagent required to functionalize the biosensor surface, while retaining compatibility with the microplate assay fluid-handling methods that are most commonly used in biological research.

Graphical abstract: A 96-well microplate incorporating a replica molded microfluidic network integrated with photonic crystal biosensors for high throughput kinetic biomolecular interaction analysis

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 20 Dec 2006, accepted on 08 Mar 2007 and first published on 21 Mar 2007


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/B618584C
Citation: Lab Chip, 2007,7, 550-556
  •   Request permissions

    A 96-well microplate incorporating a replica molded microfluidic network integrated with photonic crystal biosensors for high throughput kinetic biomolecular interaction analysis

    C. J. Choi and B. T. Cunningham, Lab Chip, 2007, 7, 550
    DOI: 10.1039/B618584C

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements