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Issue 4, 2006
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Soft matter with hard skin: From skin wrinkles to templating and material characterization

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Abstract

The English-language dictionary defines wrinkles as “small furrows, ridges, or creases on a normally smooth surface, caused by crumpling, folding, or shrinking”. In this paper we review the scientific aspects of wrinkling and the related phenomenon of buckling. Specifically, we discuss how and why wrinkles/buckles form in various materials. We also describe several examples from everyday life, which demonstrate that wrinkling or buckling is indeed a commonplace phenomenon that spans a multitude of length scales. We will emphasize that wrinkling is not always a frustrating feature (e.g., wrinkles in human skin), as it can help to assemble new structures, understand important physical phenomena, and even assist in characterizing chief material properties.

Graphical abstract: Soft matter with hard skin: From skin wrinkles to templating and material characterization

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Publication details

The article was received on 25 Nov 2005, accepted on 24 Jan 2006 and first published on 08 Feb 2006


Article type: Review Article
DOI: 10.1039/B516741H
Citation: Soft Matter, 2006,2, 310-323
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    Soft matter with hard skin: From skin wrinkles to templating and material characterization

    J. Genzer and J. Groenewold, Soft Matter, 2006, 2, 310
    DOI: 10.1039/B516741H

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