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Issue 37, 2006
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EPR spectroscopy as a probe of metal centres in biological systems

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Abstract

Molecular paramagnetism pervades the bioinorganic chemistry of V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mo, W, and of a number of non-biological transition elements. To date we can look back at half a century of fruitful EPR studies on metalloproteins, and against this background evaluate the significance of modern EPR spectroscopy from the perspective of a biochemist, making a distinction between conventional continuous wave X-band spectroscopy as a reliable work horse with broad, established applicability even on crude preparations, vs. a diffuse set of “advanced EPR” technologies whose practical application typically calls for narrowly focused research hypotheses and very high quality samples. The type of knowledge on metalloproteins that is readily obtainable with EPR spectroscopy, is explained with illustrative examples, as is the relation between experimental complexity and the spin value of the system.

Graphical abstract: EPR spectroscopy as a probe of metal centres in biological systems

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Publication details

The article was received on 08 Jun 2006, accepted on 25 Jul 2006 and first published on 11 Aug 2006


Article type: Perspective
DOI: 10.1039/B608163K
Citation: Dalton Trans., 2006,0, 4415-4434
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    EPR spectroscopy as a probe of metal centres in biological systems

    W. R. Hagen, Dalton Trans., 2006, 0, 4415
    DOI: 10.1039/B608163K

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