Jump to main content
Jump to site search

Issue 2, 2005
Previous Article Next Article

Microfluidic routing of aqueous and organic flows at high pressures: fabrication and characterization of integrated polymer microvalve elements

Author affiliations

Abstract

This paper presents the first systematic engineering study of the impact of chemical formulation and surface functionalization on the performace of free-standing microfluidic polymer elements used for high-pressure fluid control in glass microsystems. System design, chemical wet-etch processes, and laser-induced polymerization techniques are described, and parametric studies illustrate the effects of polymer formulation, glass surface modification, and geometric constraints on system performance parameters. In particular, this study shows that highly crosslinked and fluorinated polymers can overcome deficiencies in previously-reported microvalve architectures, particularly limited solvent compatibility. Substrate surface modification is shown effective in reducing the friction of the polymer–glass interface and thereby facilitating valve actuation. A microchip one-way valve constructed using this architecture shows a 2 × 108 ratio of forward and backward flow rates at 7 MPa. This valve architecture is integrated on chip with minimal dead volumes (70 pl), and should be applicable to systems (including chromatography and chemical synthesis devices) requiring high pressures and solvents of varying polarity.

Graphical abstract: Microfluidic routing of aqueous and organic flows at high pressures: fabrication and characterization of integrated polymer microvalve elements

Back to tab navigation

Publication details

The article was received on 27 Aug 2004, accepted on 09 Nov 2004 and first published on 14 Dec 2004


Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/B413199A
Citation: Lab Chip, 2005,5, 184-190
  •   Request permissions

    Microfluidic routing of aqueous and organic flows at high pressures: fabrication and characterization of integrated polymer microvalve elements

    B. J. Kirby, D. S. Reichmuth, R. F. Renzi, T. J. Shepodd and B. J. Wiedenman, Lab Chip, 2005, 5, 184
    DOI: 10.1039/B413199A

Search articles by author

Spotlight

Advertisements