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Issue 18, 1994
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High-resolution electron microscopy studies of a microporous carbon produced by arc-evaporation

Abstract

The soot produced as a byproduct of fullerene synthesis by arc-evaporation consists of a microporous carbon with a surface area, after activation with carbon dioxide, of ca. 700 m2 gā€“1. Here, we investigate the structure of this material, and its appearance after electron irradiation and high-temperature heat treatment, using high-resolution electron microscopy. We show that the heat treatment transforms the new carbon into a structure containing large, tube-like pores, rather than into polycrystalline graphite. This suggests that the arc-evaporated carbon may have a novel, fullerene-related microstructure, and that it may be the precursor for nanotube formation.

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Article type: Paper
DOI: 10.1039/FT9949002799
Citation: J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans., 1994,90, 2799-2802
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    High-resolution electron microscopy studies of a microporous carbon produced by arc-evaporation

    P. J. F. Harris, S. C. Tsang, J. B. Claridge and M. L. H. Green, J. Chem. Soc., Faraday Trans., 1994, 90, 2799
    DOI: 10.1039/FT9949002799

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